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Sudden Cardiac Arrest vs. Heartattack
Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs)
Cardiac Arrest Survival Act (CASA)
AED Program Implementation
AED Liability
Payments
Sudden Cardiac Arrest vs. Heartattack Top 
Q. What is Sudden Cardiac Arrest?
A. Sudden cardiac arrest means that the heart unexpectedly and abruptly quits beating. This is usually caused by an abnormal heart rhythm called ventricular fibrillation.

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Q. Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest the same as a heart attack?
A. No. A heart attack is a condition in which the blood supply to the heart muscle is suddenly blocked, resulting in the death of the heart muscle. Heart attack victims usually (but not always) experience chest pain and usually remain conscious. Heart attacks are serious and sometimes will lead to sudden cardiac arrest. However, sudden cardiac arrest may occur independently from a heart attack and without warning signs. Sudden cardiac arrest results in death if not treated immediately.

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Q. What are the symptoms of Sudden Cardiac Arrest?
A. The symptoms of Sudden Cardiac Arrest are the following:

•Loss of consciousness
•Loss of pulse and blood pressure
•Abnormal breathing

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Q. What are the symptoms of a Heart Attack?
A. The symptoms of a Heart Attack are the following:

•Chest Pains - uncomfortable pressure, tightness of the chest
•Pain in the arms, neck, and shoulder
•Sweating
•Nausea
•Dizziness
•Labored breathing
•Heart Palpitations

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Q. How is Sudden Cardiac Arrest treated?
A. The only effective treatment for Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is an electrical shock called defibrillation. Defibrillation is an electrical current applied to the chest. The electrical current passes through the heart with the goal of stopping the ventricle fibrillation and giving an opportunity for the heart's normal electrical system to take control. This current helps the heart reorganize the electrical activity so it can pump blood again. An automated external defibrillator (AED) can defibrillate the heart.

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Q. How is a Heart Attack treated?
A. A Heart Attack is most effectively treated by emergency responders. Lay responders can assist the victim until the emergency responders arrive by having the Heart Attack victim chew some aspirin and drink a whole glass of water if they are conscious. If the victim is unconscious, lay the victim on his or her back and make sure nothing obstructs his or her airway. If the victim becomes unconscious, it is possible for him or her to go into sudden cardiac arrest. CPR may need to be administered if the Heart Attack victim loses his or her heart pulse. In this situation if the pulse has stopped, then a defibrillator may be used if necessary.

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Q. What is an Automated External Defibrillator or AED?
A. An Automated External Defibrillator (AED) Is a portable electronic device that automatically diagnoses the potentially life threatening cardiac arrhythmia of ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia in a patient, and is able to treat them through defibrillation, the application of electrical therapy which stops the arrhythmia, allowing the heart to reestablish an effective rhythm. An AED is a device which can save a victim that suffers from Sudden Cardiac Arrest.

AEDs are designed to be simple to use for the layman, and the use of AEDs is taught in many first aid, first responder and basic life support (BLS) level CPR classes.

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Q. Do you need to purchase an Automated External Defibrillator (AED)?
A. HeartSafe America offers AEDs from 6 of the top manufactures. Purchase an AED from our online store at AED-SHOP.com today.

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Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) Top 
Q. What is an Automated External Defibrillator or AED?
A. An Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is a portable electronic device that automatically diagnoses the potentially life threatening cardiac arrhythmia of ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia in a patient,and is able to treat them through defibrillation, the application of electrical therapy which stops the arrhythmia, allowing the heart to reestablish an effective rhythm.

AEDs are designed to be simple to use for the layman, and the use of AEDs is taught in many first aid, first responder and basic life support (BLS) level CPR classes.

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Q. How does an AED work?
A. A microprocessor inside the defibrillator interprets (analyzes) the victim's heart rhythm through adhesive electrodes. The computer analyzes the heart rhythm and advises the operator whether a shock is needed. AEDs advise a shock only for ventricular fibrillation and fast ventricular tachycardia. The electric current is delivered through the victim's chest wall through adhesive electrode pads.

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Q. Why are AED's important?
A. AED's strength the chain of survival. They can restore a normal heart rhythm in sudden cardiac arrest victims. Also, new portable models allow more people to respond to a medical emergency where defibrillation is required. When a person suffers a sudden cardiac arrest, for each minute that passes without defibrillation, their chance of survival decreases by 7-10 percent. AED's save lives!

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Q. Who can use an AED?
A. Almost anyone can learn to operate an AED with a few hours of training-no medical background is needed to use an AED. In fact, the American Heart Association says,“AEDs are sophisticated, computerized devices that are reliable and simple to operate, enabling lay rescuers with minimal training to administer this lifesaving intervention” (a defibrillation shock), and “flight attendants, security personnel, sports marshals, police officers, firefighters, lifeguard, family members, and many other trained laypersons have used AEDs successfully.”

AEDs are designed to help people with minimal training safely use them in tense, emergency situations. They have numerous built-in safeguards and are designed to deliver a shock only if the AED detects that one is necessary.

Their ease of use and built-in safety mechanisms make AEDs suitable for use in community or company-wide programs.

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Q. Isn’t calling 911 enough?
A. Emergency medical service (EMS) professionals and firefighters save many SCA victims each year, but a lack of equipment and time delays keep them from saving many more.

Lack of equipment

Unfortunately, not every emergency vehicle carries a defibrillator, the only device that can treat sudden cardiac arrest.

In some large metropolitan areas, an ambulance may not even get to the scene in less than 10 minutes due to traffic. And, on average, it takes EMS teams in the U.S. 6-12 minutes to arrive. So, even if an EMS team does have a defibrillator, the response time may not be fast enough to save a victim's life.

Survival rates are highest for patients who receive a defibrillation shock within three minutes of collapse. This almost requires that an AED be on-site anywhere groups of people gather and that trained responders are available.

Remember, 90-95 percent of all SCA victims die. Documented AED programs have shown that survival rates can rise to 70 percent or more when an AED program is in place.

Waiting for medical professionals when someone is in sudden cardiac arrest could delay treatment - and could cost the person his or her life.

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Q. What about the liability in buying an AED?
A. Some organizations and communities let their concern about liability for AED acquisition and use as a stumbling block. There is good news: all 50 states in the U.S. have Good Samaritan laws, giving some immunity to lay people who help others in distress. On the federal level, the Cardiac Arrest Survival Act of 2000 encourages placement of AEDs in federal buildings and protects users, purchasers and trainers from litigation following emergency use of an AED. In all Canadian provinces, volunteer rescuers who use AEDs in an emergency have liability protection.

These laws, combined with wider use of AEDs and mounting evidence that AEDS improve survival rates, are setting a new standard of care.

“In most settings, the medical benefits of AEDs far outweigh any legal risks,” counsels Richard A. Lazar, an attorney in the field. “As these devices become more widely used, there will potentially be greater liability risk for not adopting AED programs.”

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Q. Do AEDs actually improve survival rates?
A. It has been proven that AEDs can dramatically improve survival rates for sudden cardiac arrest. In two studies, survival rates exceeded the national average by 10 times when AEDs were readily available.1,2In one of these studies, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, survival rates in witnessed cases of SCA due to ventricular fibrillation reached 74 percent when the first shock was given within three minutes.2These studies prove what has been intuitively known for years: early defibrillation by trained laypersons works and the earlier SCA victims are defibrillated, the better the outcome.

1White, R.D. et al. 1996. High discharge survival rate after out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation with rapid defibrillation by police and paramedics. Annals of Emergency Medicine 28: 480-485.

2Valenzuela, T.D. et al. 2000. Outcomes of rapid defibrillation by security officers after cardiac arrest in casinos.

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Q. Should I do CPR first or apply the AED?
A. Perform CPR only until the AED arrives. Apply the electrodes to the patient's bare chest and follow the voice prompts and messages of the AED. It will tell you when to resume CPR. CPR is a holding action until the heart is defibrillated.

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Q. If defibrillation is so important, why should I do CPR?
A. CPR provides some circulation of oxygen rich blood to the victim's heart and brain. This circulation delays both brain death and the death of heart muscle. CPR buys some time until the AED can arrive and also makes the heart more likely to respond to defibrillation.

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Q. I hear the AED has a IP rating, what does that mean?
A. The IP Code defined in international standard IEC 60529 classifies the degrees of protection provided against the intrusion of solid objects (including body parts like hands and fingers), dust, accidental contact, and water in electrical enclosures. It consists of the letters IP (for "international protection rating" sometimes also interpreted as ("ingress protection rating") followed by two digits and an optional letter. The standard aims to provide users more detailed information than vague marketing terms such as "waterproof".

The following AEDs have the highest to lowest IP rating:


•HeartSine Samaritan PAD: IP56
•Medtronic LP1000: IP55
•Philips FRx: IP55
•Zoll AED Plus: IP55
•Philips FR2: IP54
•Defibtech Lifeline: IP54
•Welch Allyn AED 10: IP24
•Cardiac Science G3: IP24
•Philips Onsite: IP21
•Medtronic CR Plus: IPX4*

*Splashing Water, Water splashing against the enclosure from any direction shall have no harmful effect.

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Cardiac Arrest Survival Act (CASA) Top 
Q. What is the Cardiac Arrest Survival Act (CASA) of 2000?
A. The Cardiac Arrest Survival Act (CASA) of 2000 was passed due to the findings from a Sudden Cardiac Arrest study. It was determined that approximately 700 people in the United States are lost every day due to SCA. Approximately 5% of the victims of Sudden Cardiac Arrest will survive. Congress agreed that it was important to place AEDs in federal buildings to decrease the amount of deaths that could occur due to Sudden Cardiac Arrest.

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Q. What is the purpose of the CASA Act of 2000?
A. The purpose of the CASA Act of 2000 is to create awareness about AEDs and Sudden Cardiac Arrest. Due to the fact that so many Americans die each year from SCA, it is important to have the proper medical equipment on site to treat SCA. Since it takes emergency responders approximately 10-12 minutes to respond, the chances of survival from SCA is minimal. By placing AEDs in federal buildings allows for the survival rate to increase significantly.

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Q. Who does the CASA Act of 2000 affect?
A. The CASA Act of 2000 was created to institute AED programs in federal buildings.

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Q. Who is protected by the CASA Act of 2000?
A. The CASA Act of 2000 has a Good Samaritan clause. Any good samaritan that attempts to aid an individual suffering from SCA by using an AED and performing CPR is free of any liability if the victim becomes injured or dies. Any medical responder that aids an individual suffering from SCA by using an AED and performing CPR is free of liability as long as they have followed the proper medical guidelines for using the meidcal equipment and CPR. Any federal organization that purchases an AED is free from liability as long as it has notified the proper authorities of the medical equipment, has maintained and performed tests on the medical equipment and it has provided training to employees.

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AED Program Implementation Top 
Q. How can my organization implement an AED Program?
A. Implementing an AED Program for your organization can save the life of an individual that may suffer from Sudden Cardiac Arrest. While buying an AED does not guarantee every victim will be saved, it will substantially increase survival rates from 5% to 65-75%. However, in order to achieve maximum results, a comprehensive program must be implemented. Below is a list of steps to do so:

1.Select a Program Coordinator:
Accountability is the key to any project. Therefore, a single individual must be selected to implement the program and maintain it after initial deployment is completed.
2.Get Decision Makers Support:
In any organization, it all starts at the top. Therefore, in order for the program to gain notoriety and thrive financially, support from executive leadership is needed. Since most Decision Makers are subjected to large amounts of stress and long hours, SCA should be a concern for them and gaining support should be easy once the facts are presented.
3.Review State & Federal Laws:
Laws exist to protect people. Therefore, to implement an effective program, the Coordinator must familiarize himself or herself with the Laws that have been put in place to protect those who purchase AEDs and use them.
4.Obtain Medical Oversight:
As lay people, we may not understand the full scope of implementing an AED Program. Therefore, employing a Medical Professional to oversee program development, deployment and maintenance will have a profound impact on its success. Think of it as a “Technical Support Plan” for your computer. **In some states, Medical Direction and Oversight is a requirement**
5.AED Selection:
When selecting an AED, research and compare the features of different devices to find the one that best fits your organizational needs. If possible, work with a multi-line AED Distributor who can help you understand the key differences between the devices and consult on the selection.
6.AED Placement:
If I had to rank the importance of each step, AED Placement would be at the very top. Since AED and AED Cabinets are not the most attractive pieces of décor, many organizations try to hide them or unknowingly place them in inappropriate spots. However, in order to achieve the American Heart Association’s goal of three minutes from drop to “shock”, AEDs must be placed in high traffic, centrally located areas near other emergency medical equipment. In following this recommendation, the device will be very visible and easily accessible if a Sudden Cardiac Arrest occurs.
7.Training:
All AEDs on the market today have clear prompts, which guide the responder through the save. However, as the old saying goes: “practice makes perfect”. Therefore, it is highly recommend that your entire organization attend a CPR/AED training course administered by the American Heart Association, American Red Cross or equivalent training organization. If training everyone is cost prohibitive, select an appropriate number of individuals to be designated as an Emergency Response Team and have them trained.

Once these steps have been completed, the real work begins. During the initial deployment, enthusiasm and interest will be extremely high. However, after training is completed and the AEDs are placed in their cabinets, most will forget that they exist. Therefore, the Program Coordinator will be responsible for keeping the program compliant and visible. Below is a list of ongoing AED Program responsibilities:

•Monthly Inspections: Every month, the AED(s) must be inspected to ensure functionality. This inspection consists of checking the status indicator and the pad expiration dates (Adult & Pediatric). If the status indicator is “flashing” and the pads are within the expiration, the device is “Rescue Ready”.
•CPR/AED Training: Depending on the training curriculum which your organization has chosen, training renewals will occur every year or every other year. Therefore, the Program Coordinator must track the renewals and schedule re-certifications.
•Ongoing Awareness: As new members join the organization and old members forget, periodic AED reminders should be published. These reminders should include AED location, list of trained responders and protocol for responding.

Deciding to purchase an AED is a great decision and an excellent benefit for your members and/or employees but this decision cannot be validated without proper deployment. Therefore, it is essential that you follow these steps to ensure that if the time arises, your AED Program is prepared to save a life!

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AED Liability Top 
Q. Is there a liability factor owning an AED (Automated External Defibrillator)?
A. This question tends to be the number one factor in determining if a corporate, fitness, church or any other organization considers purchasing an automated external defibrillator (AED) for their facility.

There are several factors supporting why liability should no longer be the number one deterrent when considering implementing an AED program. With the passing of the CASA act (Cardiac Arrest Survival Act) of 2000, passed by Bill Clinton, immunity measures from liability for the entity and/or person utilizing an AED in good faith have been enacted on a federal level.

The Cardiac Arrest Survival Act (CASA)1 now requires the U.S. Secretary of the Health and Human Services Department to establish guidelines for placing AEDs in federal buildings. These guidelines must include the proper placement of the AEDs and the appropriate procedures are followed:

•Implement the appropriate training program of the AED device and CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation)
•Ensure the proper testing and ongoing maintenance of the AED
•Ensuring the proper licensed medical direction and oversight of the program
•Ensure that local EMS (Emergency Medical Services) have been notified of the devices and incidents and uses of the devices

When these guidelines were published, they lead to community based defibrillation programs leading to more unified state AED laws, regulations and training requirements, otherwise known as Good Samaritan laws.

Mr. Richard Lazar, a legal expert on emergency medical services topics and an advisor to the National Center for Early Defibrillation states: "The perceptions and fear of legal liability continue to serve as barriers to large-scale adoption of public access defibrillation (PAD) programs in out-of-hospital settings."

With the help of the medical community’s experience of implementing multiple PAD programs across the US and the advancement in technology, AEDs have become more accessible and easier to purchase without the fear of liability. The trend and fear of not having an AED available at larger, more populated facilities, such as fitness facilities or sporting event venues, is starting to actually turn the other direction.

In the last several years, the liability factor for not having an AED has come up in multiple law suits across the country. Two of the most notable law suits happened in Florida on two separate occasions.

The first of which occurred at the Busch Gardens Theme Park when a 13 year old child died from Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA). The park did NOT have an AED on site and was sued by the family. The Jury awarded a judgment of $500,000.00 in damages to the victim’s family.

A second example of a liability issue for not having an AED on site came to light at the “Q Sports Club” fitness center, in Florida. In this particular case a 42 year old gentleman went into SCA and the facility did not have an AED on sight. They were not able to revive the gentleman and he ended up in a coma with no brain function. This case settled out of court for the sum of 2.25 million dollars.

Cases like these clearly illustrate the liability risks that impact businesses can be greatly reduced by implementing AED programs. Obtaining the proper medical direction, following Good Samaritan laws, and receiving the proper CPR/AED training from an experienced and accredited training center, are all major factors in implementing a successful and compliant program.


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1Lazar R.A. Understanding legal issues: National Center for Early Defibrillation

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Payments Top 
Q. Do you wish to pay with Credit Card?
A. AED-SHOP.com accepts all major credit cards. Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express and PAY-PAL.

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Q. Do you wish to pay with check?
A. AED-SHOP.com will accept a check. The check would need to be submitted to the company and processed before any shipment will be shipped out. This processes could take 10-15 business days.

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Q. Do you wish to pay with a Purchase Order?
A. AED-SHOP.com will accept a Purchase Order from businesses, government entitites, and schools. Credit verifications will be made for anyone that wishes to submit a PO as a term of payment. Please contact us if you wish to pay with a PO so that we can disclose all the details about paying with a PO.

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